Author Archives: Paul

ONBG meeting, 12 March 2017

A Newbee special We gathered at the Marsh Harrier pub in Oxford on a Sunday afternoon to discuss beekeeping with some interested “newbees” who were seriously considering keeping bees themselves. It’s remarkable how bees spark discussion: just carrying in a … Continue reading

Posted in Apiary visits, Hives, Meetings, Members, ONBG, Pests, TBH | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Beginners start here

The first OxNatBees meeting of 2017 will be at the Marsh Harrier Pub in Oxford at 2pm on Sunday 12th of March. The main focus will be on discussing plans for the coming year. There will also be some ‘pre-beginners’ who … Continue reading

Posted in Meetings, TBH | 1 Comment

Angry bees

This article dispels the myth that our native black bees are inherently ‘bad’, i.e. overly-defensive, and instead sets out the real genetic basis of why crossing bee races, black or otherwise, can lead to hybrids which are predisposed to be … Continue reading

Posted in Honey bee research, Stings | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Winter forage

After some frosty days, a warm sunny one yesterday and the bees were out harvesting any blossom. Snowdrops provide a source of pollen, needed for early brood raising. Today it’s chilly again and they’re all indoors. In winter, you take … Continue reading

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Calm bees

People sometimes ask, how can I keep my bees calm? Particularly when I open a hive? This post covers this aspect of beekeeping. The common theme is that the bees do not feel threatened.

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Spreading the Bee Buzz #10 – Surviving Winter

The latest in our series on beekeeping for a village magazine – written for non-beekeepers, and to suit the broad range of ages and knowledge among the readers. Over winter insect life disappears from our gardens. The frosts have killed … Continue reading

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Open mating and genetics – Drones

Conventional beekeepers aiming to maximise honey production suppress swarms, replace queens with ones from breeders, and cull drones as a “waste of resources”. This post covers some of the less discussed, subtle implications of drone genetics; and advantages of queens … Continue reading

Posted in Honey bee research, Research, Swarms | Tagged , , | 1 Comment